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Series 1, Correspondence from Eugene A. Gasseaux, 1943 May 16 - 1946 May 14

 Series — Multiple Containers

Scope and Contents

This series contains 307 letters from EM3/C Eugene A. Gasseaux, USN to Ruth A. Adams during the Second World War. His correspondence is written primarily aboard the USS Jobb from the Pacific Theater. Gasseaux wrote to Ruth as if a lover, though it is unclear how close they really were. Another sailor, PFC Leon Galvia, USA, mentions the two of them as a couple in his letters to Ruth (Series 2).

Of note are the following:
  • November 1944: began writing from the South Pacific; one letter has location cutout by the censor
  • December 10, 1944: a racist Christmas V-Mail containing a crude depiction of an African American
  • February 20, 1945 (postmark): no letter, three Japanese government bank notes, including: two (1) centavo bills and one (5) centavo bill
  • April 4, 1945: one Victory peso from the Philippines and one clipping
  • August 11, 1945: “In fact everything is better than usual. I am talking about the Japanese offer to surrender. That’s the best news I’ve heard in a long time. When we heard it you should of [sic] seen this harbor. It was really something. All the ships were sending up rockets and flares. It looked like the fourth of July only more so. This island was lit up like New York City. I have never in my life seen anything like it...I hope we take them up on it anyway.”
  • December 5, 1945: top of first page says "Inibig Kita Magandang Dalaga," which is Tagalog for "I love you beautiful girl."
  • January 11, 1946: back in San Francisco
  • March 26, 1946: in San Diego

Dates

  • 1943 May 16 - 1946 May 14

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research.

Biographical / Historical

Electrician's Mate Third Class Eugene Gasseaux, United States Navy enlisted September 1, 1943 and initially deployed aboard the USS Jobb from Norfolk, Virginia in September 1944 but was immediately turned back to the harbor due to a hurricane, then to New York for repairs after a technical issue. They got underway in October and passed through the Panama Canal to serve in the South Pacific, including Borneo and New Guinea, then the Leyte campaign in the Philippines, Okinawa, and several other locations before conducting anti-submarine patrols between the Philippines and Ulithi for the last part of the war.

Extent

1.05 Linear Feet (15 folders)

Language of Materials

English

Arrangement

This series is arranged chronologically.

Repository Details

Part of the Center for American War Letters Archives Repository

Contact:
Leatherby Libraries
Chapman University
Orange CA 92866 United States